Humanities Insights from a NEH Intern: Part 2

by Kevin Donnelly

Kevin, pictured left, enjoying the company of one of his fraternity brothers after receiving the President's Cup for best Greek organization on campus.

Kevin, pictured left, enjoying the company of one of his fraternity brothers after receiving the President’s Cup for best Greek organization on campus.

As my internship at the National Endowment for the Humanities comes to a close, I find myself reflecting on the experience as a whole. This being my first internship experience, I really had no idea what to expect. I had heard all of the classic intern horror stories: Scurrying to get coffee, make copies, answer phones, respond to emails, the monotony goes on. I was determined that my internship experience was not going to be like that, so when my program coordinator at the University of Maryland sent out an email about an internship opportunity in the NEH’s Office of White House and Congressional Affairs, I took immediate interest. Being a government and politics major, an internship at a federal agency seemed like the perfect match for me. Moreover, working in a Congressional affairs office presented me with the opportunity to interact with policymakers on the hill, something I sought from an internship from the beginning. To say my curiosity was piqued is an understatement, and the fact that I didn’t even know what the National Endowment for the Humanities did wasn’t going to stop me for trying to become a part of it.

Needless to say, when I was offered an intern position at the NEH I was thrilled. Arriving in the Old Post Office Pavilion for the first time was quite an experience, one I would come to appreciate as time went on. The tourist-filled food court and bombastic lunchtime performances gave the old place a unique character I won’t soon forget. The first meeting I had with the three C’s (All three women I worked with had names beginning with C) and my fellow interns demonstrated to me that this office was somewhere I wanted to be. Even though I came into the internship wary of what might be I immediately felt welcomed by colleagues and the staff. Each of us interns was assigned to a specific task, mine being the development of content for reports highlighting how the NEH serves certain constituencies. Writing has always been a passion of mine, and it has played a huge role in my academic career. I appreciated being given an assignment that took advantage of my existing skills while simultaneously teaching me new ones.  In looking up grants, images, and other data for each report, I was able to enhance my research skills and utilize methods of inquiry previously unavailable to me. Often I had to maintain email correspondences with program directors, museum curators, artists, and nonprofit staff, and I enjoyed the opportunity to fine tune my professional communication skills. I was also able to learn so much about how NEH programs benefit people across the nation. From family literacy programs to veteran-related projects, the NEH funds initiatives serving every demographic in all of the humanities fields. In researching the NEH’s broad spectrum of grants I gained a better understanding of the agency’s immense purview and impact.

I was also responsible for setting up meetings with the offices of freshmen members of Congress, a task I had looked forward to since I arrived in the Office of White House and Congressional Affairs. Don’t worry – it’s not that I actually enjoy the logistics of setting up meetings, I’m not crazy – but I do support what the NEH does and jumped on the opportunity to spread the word on Capitol Hill. Because I potentially want to pursue a career in public service it was especially interesting to experience a Hill meeting firsthand. Though I’m not always the most organized person, scheduling meetings on the Hill taught me respect for an organized schedule, an invaluable skill if I want to succeed in the future.

I was also fortunate enough to have some great times thanks to my colleagues and the agency in general. Being able to attend the 42nd Jefferson Lecture featuring Martin Scorsese was a truly enlightening privilege, and one I won’t soon forget. Seeing the reports I had worked on for three months come to life before my eyes was totally gratifying. Covering our Director’s office in googly eyes on April Fool’s Day on the other hand was 100 percent fun. I can safely say that all of the internship myths about fetching coffee or answering phones did not apply to my experience at the NEH, which provided me the best of both worlds.

I have really found a place in my heart for the NEH. I’m so thankful that I was able to better myself and the agency, and am even more appreciative to gain the knowledge that I have. Before interning at the NEH I barely knew what the humanities were. Now I’m left with a deep and lasting respect for the humanities that will stay with me forever. I’ll miss the NEH and I’m so happy knowing that I’ve made lasting relationships with great people at a great agency. Thank you all!

Kevin Donnelly is working towards his Bachelors of Arts in Government and Politics at the University of Maryland. He is planning to pursue a master in Public Policy, focusing either on International Economic Policy or Education Policy. Originally from Rockville, MD, Kevin is a local who loves D.C. but resents taking it for granted. He loves cars and hopes to one day have a garage the size of Jay Leno’s. He plans on graduating in May of 2016 and pursuing a career in public policy.

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Humanities Insights from a NEH Intern: Part 1

by Katherine Kipp

Katherine posing with a very photogenic camel in India, 2011. After her NEH internship ends, Katherine will head back to India for a six-week trip.

Katherine posing with a very photogenic camel in India, 2011. After her NEH internship ends, Katherine will head back to India for a six-week trip.

As I approach the end of my internship at the National Endowment for the Humanities, it occurs to me that the internship’s end coincides with my fourth year in graduate school, equaling the amount of time I spent as an undergrad. By the time I graduate with my Master of Fine Arts degree in fiction writing next May, I will have spent more time in graduate school than as an undergraduate.

It also occurs to me that my time at NEH, while my third time working as an intern, comes after a five-year gap from my last internship. Coincidentally, my last internship was also in D.C., when I was studying at the Washington Journalism Center for a semester.

I entered the NEH internship with really no idea of what to expect. Would I be stapling papers? Making coffee? Hailing taxis? My last two internships had been at newspapers, and I had spent most of my time interviewing, transcribing interviews, and turning interviews into stories.

Plus, up until the point I received an email from the Academic Coordinator in my Master’s program, advertising the internship, I had never heard of the National Endowment for the Humanities. I wasn’t even completely sure what the humanities were, and I’m an English major three times over! All I knew for sure was that my internship would be in the Office of White House and Congressional Affairs, the three women I would be working with all had names that start with a “C,” and the offices are located in the Old Post Office Pavilion, floors above where hordes of middle schoolers gather to eat Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and cookies during their school trips to Washington, D.C.

I learned quickly that I, and my fellow interns, would all be assigned specific tasks to work on. Each task made use of a particular skillset of ours that we were already bringing to the table, and pushed us to expand that skillset and apply it to our day-to-day work at the NEH. I was charged to develop and write material for the new Congressional Affairs blog. I’ve been writing in some form or fashion since 2nd grade. This interest of mine has taken me from writing for my college’s newspaper, to writing short stories for local competitions, to freelancing for small-town newspapers, and, most recently, to obtaining a Master of Fine Arts degree in fiction writing.

Even though writing the blog would allow me to use part of a skillset I’m comfortable with, I was tasked with developing material for blog posts in a field I was mostly unfamiliar with just a few months ago. Luckily, I work with some amazing people (not just in my office, but the whole of NEH) who were happy to share ideas for potential blog posts. Through this, I was able to learn about the Division of Education Programs’ Summer Institutes, the many documentaries and radio shows Public Programs has funded, and the ways people and institutions are combining humanities and technology to provide updated and innovative ideas. So, while I was writing blog posts informing congressional staff members and constituents about the amazing contributions NEH has made and continues to make to the humanities world, I was also able to truly understand the great impact NEH has had on society—and it was right underneath my nose the whole time. I even went so far as to research NEH-funded programs and events in my hometown: there have been 36, dating back all the way to the early 1980s!

In addition to detailing the good work NEH does on our blog, I was able to do so in person as well through visits with the staff of freshmen members of Congress. Of all the experiences I have had since beginning my time at the NEH, those meetings were the most unexpected for me. I had not been seeking out a Congressional affairs position, so meeting with Congressional staff on a regular basis was a pleasant surprise. I’m glad to be able to communicate the good work NEH does to congressional staff members, knowing they’ll pass the message along to fellow employees and constituents in their districts.

And then there was the fun stuff! I became friends with my two fellow interns, people I probably would never have met otherwise, and with them (and a little help from our advisors as well) covered our Director’s office in googly eyes for April Fool’s Day. I attended the 42nd Jefferson Lecture on the Humanities, featuring Martin Scorsese, and an event centered on the NEH-funded documentary No Job for a Woman: The Women Who Fought to Report WWII, featuring Soledad O’Brien. I trekked to the Executive Office Building for a meeting and came within inches of meeting Joe Biden. (Kidding—I just like to imagine that he was there.) From days with special events like the White House briefing to trekking through mazes of 8th graders on my way to grab Indian food, working at the NEH was always an adventure.

But the biggest skill I gained was a newfound respect for the humanities, an educated understanding of what NEH does, and admiration for the people who work every day to make the NEH great. I will miss this place once I’m gone!

Katherine Kipp is working toward her Master of Fine Arts degree in fiction writing at the University of Maryland. She has a MA in English from Southeast Missouri State University (Cape Girardeau, MO), a BA in English and Journalism from Union University (Jackson, Tenn.), and worked for several years as a freelance journalist. A Tennessean at heart, even though she lost the accent (or never had it to begin with), she loves drinking coffee, smelling old books, running, and, obviously, writing. She plans on graduating in the spring of 2014 and pursuing a career in education.

Meet the National Student Poets

On Friday we posted an interview with Olivia Morgan, the founder of the new National Student Poets Program (NSPP). NSPP selects five poets from those who received a National Gold or Silver Medal in the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards competition.

539029_485061978224579_1643518629_nThese five serve as ambassadors – each representing a different region of the country –   who encourage other young writers at schools with few resources for teaching poetry. During their yearlong tenure, the poets participate in readings across the country and organize a service event in their region. Below are short biographies of the first winners of the NSPP.

The inaugural class of National Student Poets from left to right: Miles Hewitt, age 17, of Vancouver, WA; Lylla Younes, age 17, of Alexandria, LA; Natalie Richardson, age 17, of Oak Park, IL; Claire Lee, age 16, of New York, NY; and Luisa Banchoff, age 17, of Arlington, VA. Each of these poets currently serve as literary ambassadors for National Student Poet Class of 2012. Courtesy of NSPP Facebook page.

The inaugural class of National Student Poets from left to right: Miles Hewitt, age 17, of Vancouver, WA; Lylla Younes, age 17, of Alexandria, LA; Natalie Richardson, age 17, of Oak Park, IL; Claire Lee, age 16, of New York, NY; and Luisa Banchoff, age 17, of Arlington, VA. Each of these poets currently serve as literary ambassadors for the National Student Poet Class of 2012. Courtesy of NSPP Facebook page.

Luisa Banchoff, 17, is the NSPP poet from the Southeast. She is a senior at Washington-Lee School in Arlington, Virginia. Her passion for poetry has already taken her many places. She edits her school’s literary magazine, attended the Kenyon College Young Writers Workshop, and has had the honor of reading at the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. In April she was a featured guest at Writers of Social Justice: How One Pen Changes the World, as part of the Red Mountain Writing Project in Birmingham, Alabama.

She has received the 2011 Scholastic Gold Medal in poetry, a 2012 American Voices Medal, and even a Girl Scout Gold Award (she has been a Girl Scout for ten years). Outside of receiving her many awards, Luisa also finds time to give back to her community: she led a poetry workshop at her former elementary school and set up an interactive poetry bulletin at her high school.

Miles Hewitt, 18, is the NSPP poet from the West. He is a senior at Vancouver School of Arts and Academics in Vancouver, Washington. An avid writer from an early age, he began songwriting in eight grade and has self-recorded two albums. Poetry is a new passion, and one that he follows while serving as founder and editor-in-chief of the school newspaper and taking a high level Literary Arts class.

In April, Hewitt participated in workshops with middle school students at the Boise State Writing Project and read with three other poets for the Idaho Commission on the Arts “Coasts of Idaho” at the Log Cabin Literature Center. Along with Christopher Luna (the Clark County, Washington, Poet Laureate), Hewitt led a poetry workshop at Washington State University’s At Home At School program.

Claire Lee, 16, is the Northeast NSPP poet. She attends the Chapin School in New York, NY. As a little girl, Lee chose writing stories over playing with dolls. That focus has staying with her into high school. She is the photo editor and a columnist for her school newspaper, Limelight, and is the editor-in-chief of an out-of-school newspaper, NY Girls’ Squash. In 2012, she attended the New England Young Writers’ Conference at Middlebury College (Bread Loaf). Her hard work paid off; she won the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards Regional Gold and Silver Keys for her photography and second place in the Ayn Rand’s Anthem Essay Contest.

In April, Lee was a featured presenter at the Academy of American Poets 11th Annual Poetry & Creative Mind gala at Lincoln Center. Her service project was working with the East Harlem Tutorial Program on developing a poetry workshop.

National Student Poets Miles Hewitt (far left), Lylla Younes, Claire Lee, Luisa Banchoff and Natalie Richardson (far right) pose with former U.S Poet Laureate, Philip Levine (center).

National Student Poets Miles Hewitt (far left), Lylla Younes, Claire Lee, Luisa Banchoff and Natalie Richardson (far right) pose with former U.S Poet Laureate, Philip Levine (center).

Natalie Richardson, 17, is the NSPP poet from the Midwest. She attends Oak Park and River Forest High School in  Oak Park, Illinois. Richardson has been active in her school’s Spoken Word Club and Slam Team for two years, and competed in the Louder Than a Bomb poetry festival in 2012. Her poetry has been featured on the radio station WBEZ. In addition to writing, Richardson enjoys painting and drawing.

From April 18-20, Richardson participated in 826 Michigan’s Feed Your Soul Poetry Festival in Detroit. The festival engages adults who are new to poetry, and includes schools and independent creative writing program. She is currently working on bringing Louder Than a Bomb to schools lacking a spoken word program.

Lylla Younes, 17, is the NSPP poet from the Southwest. She attends The Louisiana School, a public magnet boarding school in Natchitoches, Louisiana, and is from Alexandria, Louisiana. She credits her imagination to her mother’s storytelling when she was a child. Younes finds inspiration in works that span a variety of literary genres, and loves science and philosophy.

On April 24 and 27, Younes took part in a reading and poetry conference with inner-city youth in Albuquerque, New Mexico. On April 23,  she participated in poetry readings, performances, and workshops with the Sante Fe Indian School Spoken Word Team in Sante Fe, New Mexico.

For more information on the NSPP, visit its website. For another dose of poetry news, visit the website for the National Endowment of the Arts’ Poetry Out Loud National Competition, which features poets from all fifty state. The competition takes place in Washington, D.C. on April 29th-30th and is free and open to the public.